Spoonfull of Sugar

Picture the little kid sitting on a park bench relentlessly stuffing Halloween candy into his face.  Older man watches disapprovingly for a while, then finally says, “You know, sonny, if you keep eating bad food like that you’ll rot your teeth and ruin your stomach.”

Little kid doesn’t even pause.  “My grandfather lived to be 102,” he says (mouth full).

“So you think his eating candy all his life is why he lives so long?”

“No,” says the kid, “He minded his own fuckin business.”

Sorry I’m about a week late with that one, but I’ve been in bed trying to warm up.  This miserable weather stops me in my tracks.  And it’s early this year again!  What happened to summer?  * wah *

This was the weekend to be buried under post-election analysis.  The commentariat managed to cover all the bases from every perspective, leaving nothing clearer, let alone a consensus.   That’s why this little note caught my eye:

The Polish philosopher Leszek Kolakowski, in what he called the law of the infinite cornucopia, stated that there was never a shortage of arguments to support any doctrine one wanted to believe in for whatever reasons. This law is well known, if not by name, in political spin rooms and on talk shows, and is likely to continue to get quite a workout. Of course, a strong argument could also be made that nothing like that will happen at all.  — NY Times.

He nailed it.  The difference between Blind Faith and Learned Wisdom is the amount of time you put into it, not the conclusions you draw out of it.   And mostly, what you draw out of it is what you were inclined to when you went into it.

I found these (less interesting) stats in the same column:

  • 53% of voters said they had an unfavorable opinion of the ‘Crats
  • 52% of voters said they had an unfavorable opinion of the ‘’Pubs.

That strikes me as ‘way low.  I can’t think of one single person I know who would tell me honestly they have a favorable opinion of either.  Maybe I just hang out with cynics.

On the mandate ‘Pubs claim they were given on election day:

  • In Exit Polls, 47% said Congress should leave the health care law alone, or expand it.  48% said they should repeal it.
  • The highest priority for Congress should be “spending to create jobs (37%), reducing the budget deficit (39%).  Only 40% of voters said they wanted Congress to extend Monkey Boy’s tax cuts for everyone.

Sounds like the only mandate in town is two guys going out together.

Voters fingered the party most to blame for the economic downturn:

  • Wall Street bankers: 35%
  • Former President Monkey Boy: 29%
  • President BHO: 23%

According to Gallup, the president’s approval rating in about 45%.  At the 1982 midterm election, President Reagan’s approval rating was 41%. [via]

So take away from this what you will – which I imagine will be what you brought with you.  Kind of like Halloween candy.  But that’s not my business, either.

This entry was posted in Gen. Snark, Maj. Snafu, Corp. Punishment. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Spoonfull of Sugar

  1. Key Liam says:

    Those are very interesting numbers, and don’t support either the kind of chest-thumping and hand-wringing the two sides have been rehearsing since the election. Basically, they indicate a balanced electorate that doesn’t agreed on anything.

  2. Joe Balls says:

    I know the little kid in that story and he’s a Democrat.

  3. Mister E says:

    Thank you for quoting a Polish philosopher.

  4. A REPUBLICAN ‘MANDATE’ IS FORMER SENATOR LARRY CRAIG HAVING A LUCKY NIGHT AT THE MINNEAPOLIS AIRPORT.

  5. Missing Lincoln says:

    You know how I love statistics. I find it telling that, according to your very numbers, 105% of voters liked neither republicans or democrats.

    This leads me to believe that the exit polls took place primarily in Miami and Chicago.

    • * Rim Shot * says:

      “Half this game is 90% mental.” — Yogi Berra

      It’s called “Statisticular cancer,” and it, too, is a pain in the balls.

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